Taking a Deep Dive into Technical Levels for Sirius XM Holdings (SIRI)

Sirius XM Holdings (SIRI) is on trader’s radar as the shares have moved below the MACD Histogram line, indicating a bearish chart.  Shares recently touched 6.24 on a recent bid. 

The MACD is calculated by subtracting the value of a 26-day exponential moving average from a 12-day exponential moving average. A 9-day dotted exponential moving average of the MACD (the “signal” line) is then plotted on top of the MACD.  Taking a step further, the MACD-Histogram, which was developed by Thomas Aspray in 1986, measures the distance between MACD and its signal line (the 9-day EMA of MACD).

Like MACD, the MACD-Histogram is also an oscillator that fluctuates above and below the zero line. Aspray developed the MACD-Histogram to anticipate signal line crossovers in MACD. Because MACD uses moving averages and moving averages lag price, signal line crossovers can come late and affect the reward-to-risk ratio of a trade. Bullish or bearish divergences in the MACD-Histogram can alert chartists to an imminent signal line crossover in MACD.

New investors may be looking at the soaring stock market and wondering if now is a good time to try and get in on the action. Leaping into the market without proper research or a solid plan may leave the investor on the short end of the stick. Creating a stock investing plan can be as simple or complex as the individual chooses. Sometimes, keeping things simple may be the best way to go. Other times, there may be more than meets the eye, and a deep-dive into the crucial data may be required. New investors may be extremely excited to start buying stocks. They may have heard some great water cooler talk about the next big stock. There is always a possibility that the hot stock chatter may end up coming to fruition, but it could just as likely turn out to be terribly erroneous. Many individuals in the financial world will be quick to provide these can’t lose picks, but until this information is thoroughly researched, investors may want to proceed with caution.

When undertaking stock analysis, investors and traders may choose to view some additional technical levels. Sirius XM Holdings (SIRI) currently has a 14-day Commodity Channel Index (CCI) of -40.45. Investors and traders may use this indicator to help spot price reversals, price extremes, and the strength of a trend. Many investors will use the CCI in conjunction with other indicators when evaluating a trade. The CCI may be used to spot if a stock is entering overbought (+100) and oversold (-100) territory.

We can also do some further technical analysis on the stock. At the time of writing, the 14-day ADX for Sirius XM Holdings (SIRI) is 16.13. Many technical chart analysts believe that an ADX value over 25 would suggest a strong trend. A reading under 20 would indicate no trend, and a reading from 20-25 would suggest that there is no clear trend signal. The ADX is typically plotted along with two other directional movement indicator lines, the Plus Directional Indicator (+DI) and Minus Directional Indicator (-DI). Some analysts believe that the ADX is one of the best trend strength indicators available.

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Interested investors may be watching the Williams Percent Range or Williams %R. Williams %R is a popular technical indicator created by Larry Williams to help identify overbought and oversold situations. Investors will commonly use Williams %R in conjunction with other trend indicators to help spot possible stock turning points. Sirius XM Holdings (SIRI)’s Williams Percent Range or 14 day Williams %R currently sits at -75.00. In general, if the indicator goes above -20, the stock may be considered overbought. Alternately, if the indicator goes below -80, this may point to the stock being oversold.

Tracking other technical indicators, the 14-day RSI is presently standing at 48.28, the 7-day sits at 43.81, and the 3-day is resting at 31.87. The Relative Strength Index (RSI) is an often employed momentum oscillator that is used to measure the speed and change of stock price movements. When charted, the RSI can serve as a visual means to monitor historical and current strength or weakness in a certain market. This measurement is based on closing prices over a specific period of time. As a momentum oscillator, the RSI operates in a set range. This range falls on a scale between 0 and 100. If the RSI is closer to 100, this may indicate a period of stronger momentum. On the flip side, an RSI near 0 may signal weaker momentum. The RSI was originally created by J. Welles Wilder which was introduced in his 1978 book “New Concepts in Technical Trading Systems”.

For further review, we can take a look at another popular technical indicator. In terms of moving averages, the 200-day is currently at 5.94, the 50-day is 6.22, and the 7-day is resting at 6.28. Moving averages are a popular trading tool among investors. Moving averages can be used to help filter out the day to day noise created by other factors. MA’s may be used to identify uptrends or downtrends, and they can be a prominent indicator for detecting a shift in momentum for a particular stock. Many traders will use moving averages for different periods of time in conjunction with other indicators to help gauge future stock price action.

There are many factors that can affect the health of a company. This is one reason why stock trading can be extremely difficult at times. Because there are always so many things to take into consideration, it may be next to impossible to create a formula that will continually beat the market. Even after all the data has been scrutinized and the numbers have been crunched, the investor still has to make sense of the information and figure out what to do with it. Knowing how to use the information about publically traded companies can end up being the difference between handsome gains and devastating losses.